Celebrating the Uns

Grandma Kc wrote this on June 6th, 2014 14 Replies

This is a special memory from my own childhood.

Kc, Judy and their mom after Mass in front of Hilldale Police Department

This picture was taken around the same time.

I remember how excited my sister and I were. We had come up with an idea that we were sure would make our mother happy, which was something we strived for. We were planning to make her an Un-Anniversary cake to commemorate the day she and our Dad got married! We were 10 and 11 and we didn’t realize it was something most people wouldn’t celebrate. She had been so excited to be divorced that we thought it deserved a party.

We made the cake while she was at work and no, we didn’t have a babysitter. We may have been two of the original latch key kids. Actually, we didn’t have keys. As bizarre as this will sound we had a ladder propped up on the side porch roof. We would climb up there and on to the roof of the house and through our bedroom window! Who needed keys?

She was thrilled with our cake.

Playing on the roof was something we often did. The porch roof was very flat so it made a wonderful place to play. I remember vividly the time we took two of the next-door neighbor girls up there to play with us. I think we were having a tea party when we saw their Mother come charging up the sidewalk which ended at our driveway. Our mom wasn’t home when it happened but it wasn’t as if she didn’t know that we played up there all the time. She had never told us we couldn’t and she had never warned us to be careful. I could tell the other Mom was very angry with us. For some reason she didn’t seem to think the roof was a safe playground.

Many years later, I got a birthday cake for my mother-in-law. Since we were going to celebrate her birthday two weeks late I got inspired and asked them to write “Merry Un-Birthday to You!” on the cake.

She was NOT thrilled with our cake!

14 thoughts on “Celebrating the Uns

    1. Grandma Kc Post author

      Well my mother-in-law was certainly offended. She refused to eat the cake which I thought was a bit extreme but I learned my lesson.

      Reply
  1. Joyce

    It really makes me laugh at how different things were from now, when every helmeted and knee-padded kid is tracked by GPS! We would put our dolls in a stroller and go to church to baptize them on Saturday afternoons. No adults in sight. Kidnappers would have had a field day! And we would have been up on that roof too – and our doors were never locked!
    I remember my mother being at the hospital with grandpa for a really long day. I proudly made her a dinner, sat her down when she came in the front door, and placed it in her lap. “Oh,” she said, “All starches!” I’ve never forgotten how I felt to have my macaroni rejected like that!

    Reply
    1. Grandma Kc Post author

      Poor little Joyce! Grandma J would never say anything so cruel or thoughtless to one of her grandchildren. Your intentions were so good and I am sure you worked very hard on it and were waiting anxiously only to be rejected. We did learn from their mistakes. I am often amazed that I survived my childhood but I try and keep a nice balance with Amara. I’m not over protective but I sure wouldn’t let her on the roof!

      Reply
  2. Judy @ NewEnglandGardenAndThread

    I love this story because I was a latch key kid, but I did have a key. 🙂 Between your memory and Joyce’s comments that about covers everything I was thinking and chuckling about as I read this. Can you imagine what we would have thought if someone told us we needed a helmet to ride a bicycle? LOL

    Reply
    1. Grandma Kc Post author

      Things were different. We didn’t have helmets or bike lanes for that matter! Yet we did survive and hopefully learned from it.

      Reply
  3. Sandy

    What a funny concept … un-anniversary cake! I’m glad your mom was happy with it. 🙂

    I remember doing some crazy stuff as a kid … climbing to the highest part of the barn to look at baby pigeons in their nest; we rarely wore shoes which led to needing tetanus shots; horseback riding accidents that weren’t too serious, but seriously painful; no seatbelts in cars. How did we ever survive our childhoods? 🙂

    Reply
  4. Launna

    Isn’t it amazing what we survived and we had fun doing it 😀 … I try to give a little leway but it’s darn scary at times…

    I would have laughed at the merry un birthday… some people don’t have a sense of humor Kc 😉

    Reply
    1. Grandma Kc Post author

      I guess we expect adults to at least act like adults even if she didn’t think it was funny she could have eaten the cake! I didn’t think it was the best example to set for her 2 grandchildren who were there. YOU would never behave like that! YOU have a sense of humor!

      Reply
  5. Sarah ~ Magnolia Surprise

    A ladder propped against the house, leading to your unlocked window, and kids home alone…. can you just imagine that today?!! It is definitely a different world! I like the merry un-birthday cake! My daughter insisted on having a half birthday celebrated on the mid-point day — it was a small celebration — more in her mind than anywhere else!

    Reply
    1. Grandma Kc Post author

      I never even thought of it that way – I’ve always just looked back and thought it insane that any mother would let their children play on the roof! I never thought about how in today’s world that ladder could have been an invitation.

      Reply
  6. Lisa @ Grandma's Briefs

    I had “A Very Merry Unbirthday” from Alice in Wonderland running through my head while reading this. (And it will now be today’s earworm, I’m sure.) I’m glad your mom liked her cake! A brilliant idea!

    I agree with everyone above on how different things are now. I was a latchkey kid, too, along with my six siblings (I’m third of seven). Crazy things went on from the time school let out and Mom got home. Even crazier things all summer long (which I think is why she signed us up for every VBS program in town, regardless of religious affiliation, just to keep us busy where adults could direct the action!).

    Reply

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